Can adults learn how to play the piano?

Adult learning how to play the piano

Many people live with the assumption that learning to play the piano is an activity that must be picked up in childhood in order to get the best results. While learning as a child can give some individuals a head start and establish them as child prodigies, most people find it difficult to muster the interest and motivation at such a young age. They then go through life believing the opportunity passed them by the moment they turned 18.

Here at the London Piano Institute, we believe that this is simply not true.

We strongly believe that the piano is a wonderful instrument that can be taken up at any age, here’s why:

Despite common misconceptions, the piano is actually far easier to learn than many other instruments – particularly string instruments. The main reason for this is that the piano is percussive. There is no tuning involved, and when you press a note you know what it should sound like – so it’s very easy to know whether or not you’re on the right track.

Once you’ve mastered the basic techniques of playing the piano, and you know how to read music accurately this gives you a solid base from which you can build your piano playing legacy.

Like mastering any skill, learning the piano does take time – but it takes a degree of time and perseverance whether you’re seven or seventy. The key to staying motivated is to be patient with yourself. Don’t beat yourself up if you can’t master a piece the first time you play it! Even the world’s greatest pianists started from scratch where you may be today!

Playing the piano is also a wonderful way to relax after, or even before, a long day at work. It is a proven stress-reliever!

Alan Rusbridger, author of Play It Again – An Amateur Against the Impossible – a fascinating book about his year learning Chopin’s No. 1 Ballade aged 56 – likens playing the piano to spending time in the gym!

He states that, for him, playing the piano before work is the equivalent of hopping on the treadmill or doing a great workout session.

Playing the piano helps to clear his mind and give him better focus in the day ahead – so, if you’re finding it difficult to be your best self at work, taking up the piano could help to improve your focus and mood throughout the working day. This is another clear benefit of taking up the instrument later on in life!

Many adults have great success learning to play the piano, so it’s never too late to give it a go! If you’ve always wanted to take up the instrument, why not look into piano lessons with the most sought-after pianists in London? We’d love to hear from you!

Tags: piano lessons, adult learning, adult piano lessons

Stefan Joubert
Stefan Joubert is the manager of the London Piano Institute. He is passionate about helping adults learn how to play the piano on Skype, FaceTime or in person. He truly believes that no one is too old or not talented enough. He is your first port of call for anything piano lessons related. You can contact him at enrol@londonpianoinstitute.co.uk
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Stefan Joubert
Stefan Joubert is the manager of the London Piano Institute. He is passionate about helping adults learn how to play the piano on Skype, FaceTime or in person. He truly believes that no one is too old or not talented enough. He is your first port of call for anything piano lessons related. You can contact him at enrol@londonpianoinstitute.co.uk

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